Bio

Gayle Crites is an artist working in a variety of media in Golden, Colorado. She received her BA from Colorado State University where she concentrated in printmaking, but some of her undergraduate art history studies were taken through the University of Mexico in Guadalajara, Jalisco, and she also produced a limited edition of prints at the Tamarind Institute in Albuquerque.  During her formative years, Crites worked as a designer and illustrator, and then developed a significant following for her work in oil. She is deeply interested in world cultures, and her travel to various countries lead her artwork from traditional media in oil painting and printmaking to large-scale experimental constructions with indigenous hand-pounded bark and natural pigments. In addition to being a local art instructor, she has been featured in magazines and books across the country, and has exhibited internationally in Japan, Mexico and the Philippines. Her work has had national exposure, primarily in Santa Fe, Denver, Los Angeles, Chicago and New York. The Allentown Art Museum made two of her artworks part of their permanent collection in 2012 and she participated in “International LELA” (Lantern of the East, Los Angeles)” at the Los Angeles Municipal Art Museum in 2013. LELA is an arts organization with roots in the communities of the Pacific Rim.  Her 2014 solo museum show with the Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art, One Thing Leads to Another”, presented at Macky Auditorium, University of Colorado in Boulder, concurrent with the University’s 66th Conference on World Affairs. The International Museum of Folk Art, Santa Fe, NM, and the Bowers Museum, Santa Ana, CA, featured Crites' work "Then Now/Now Then" in a traveling museum exhibition entitled "The Red That Colored the World" from 2015 to 2016.  This major exhibition focused on the historic and contemporary use of cochineal, a natural red dye cultivated from a scale insect, and was accompanied by the publication, "A Red Like No Other" which also featured Crites' use of the dye on hand-pounded bark.